The Death of Business Intelligence

Predictive analysis spending soars on demand for business intelligence

Posted in Analytics, Business Intelligence, IT, Microsoft, SAP by neilwilson1984 on December 12, 2013

A desire for better business intelligence is driving demand for predictive analysis software, according to a new set of figures. According to the study by Transparency Market Research, the market for predictive analytics software will be worth over $6.5 billion by 2019.

The growth is being driven by increased demand for customer intelligence, as well as fraud and security intelligence software. In addition, cloud hosted predictive analytics software solutions are seen as an emerging market that will drive growth in the near future.

Banking and finance services, insurance, government, pharmaceuticals, telecom and IT, and retail, are seen as key demand drivers during the forecast period, which will see the market more than triple in value from a base of just over $2 billion.

But the biggest growth will be in retail and manufacturing, largely due to fast growing consumer driven digital data and the subsequent need to extract strategically critical information from this data.

The study authors say a rise in incidences of frauds, payment defaults, over or under stock inventory levels, and regulations regarding governance, risk, and compliance, have pushed companies to adopt predictive analytical models.

“Demand for industry specific software solutions has caused customer intelligence, fraud and security intelligence, and campaign management to emerge as leading segments,” they say. These segments together accounted for approximately 50 per cent of market revenue in 2012.

The US and Canada will continue to lead the way as business intelligence demands drive uptake of solutions capable of analyzing big data.

“North America, which has been at the forefront of generating big data in large quantities, is expected to remain the largest market for predictiveanalytics software solutions,” the authors say.

“This is due to demand for advanced business intelligence being directly affected by need to analyze big data. Growth of predictive analytics aspect of business intelligence has seen a revival ever since big data gained popularity and has been growing exponentially.”

All this is good for companies, with competition increasing as big data vendors – SAP, SAS, Oracle, IBM, Microsoft – now entering the market for predictive analytics.

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Analytics ‘key driver’ for mobile adoption

Posted in Analytics, Business Intelligence, IT, Mobile, Mobile BI, Mobile Business Intelligence by neilwilson1984 on December 10, 2013

Speed and better analytics are proving the key drivers for global mobile adoption. That’s according to an IBM study showing 90 per cent oforganizations around the world are willing to sustain or increase investment in mobile technology over the next year to 18 months.

A key reason for upping spend on this sector is the measurable impact on speed and productivity. Half of the respondents in the poll, for example, reported a ten per cent gain in employee productivity as a result of mobile efforts.

The survey looked at the business advantages of using mobile technologies for business intelligence, including the way it “fundamentally” changes how organizations interact with customers, and develop and deliver innovative products and services to market. In particular it identified so-called mobile strategy leaders who have a clear direction for their efforts in this sector.

Data and analytics was a key difference between this subset and others. Seventy per cent or more of leaders surveyed describe themselves as effective in areas such as addressing structured and unstructured mobile data, handling large volumes of data, analyzing mobile data and taking action based on that data. Under 37 per cent of non-leaders said they are equipped to deal with these issues.

Integration is another area where there is a clear difference. Again around seven in ten of mobile leaders indicate they have been successful in ensuring interoperability with other systems, leveraging APIs for external or cloud-provided data services, and providing service-oriented architecture and sharing information among systems/devices. On the other hand, only around 40 per cent of non-leaders report being successful with these tasks.

“Today, mobile is quickly emerging as a transformational game changer in business that will drive new levels of innovation and interactions,” said Kevin Custis, social business and mobile practices leader at IBM. “It is far too limiting to define mobility simply as a device or a channel for transactions. The organizations that come out ahead will be the ones that prioritize mobile and redefine its use to drive a new set of business expectations and user experiences.”

Business intelligence: it starts with a question

Posted in Business, Business Intelligence, IT by neilwilson1984 on December 6, 2013

Business intelligence, big data, analytics – it’s so easy to think of these things are primarily about software and budgets. Spend more on expensive software applications and you’ll do better, so many people believe.

But that’s really looking at the issue the wrong way round. Business intelligence, so it is argued, begins not with pricey software but with something a lot more straightforward; a question about what you want to do with your business.

This is the view of Rusty Frioux, who wants firms to take a step back and ask themselves what it is they want to achieve. The founder and managing principal at DataClear explains: “A lot of people think that data analytics is all about expensive software. And while some enterprise reporting software packages can be very helpful for some organizations, they’re not always necessary and are often the wrong first choice for your investment dollars.

“Before you start thinking about tools, it’s important to take a step back and understand what questions you want answered and what data you’re already collecting. Analytics doesn’t start with data – or with software. It starts with a question you have about your business.”

To this end, the business intelligence consulting firm has released a guide to help. The publication pinpoints specific data points and reports companies can use to solve common problems.

The guide is designed as a “brainstorming tool” for companies who think that understanding the data they already collect might lead to better decision-making. It includes ideas and tactics for finance and accounting, operations, human resources, and sales and marketing.

According to Matillion, one of the main issues that can lead to problems with BI strategies is organizations put their focus on the wrong elements and in the wrong order. by focusing first on the fundamentals – the question you want answered, companies can get off on the right foot. The expensive software and applications can come later.

Big data drives software spending

Posted in Analytics, Business, Business Intelligence, IT by neilwilson1984 on December 4, 2013

Companies are devoting more resources to business intelligence, upping their investment in big data and analytics.

According to latest figures from International Data Corporation (IDC), year-over-year growth in the worldwide software market for 2013 has been revised down to 4.3 per cent.

However, spending on BI solutions will hold up over the coming years, the firm’s Worldwide Semiannual Software Tracker indicates.

Collaborative applications along with structured data management software and data access, analysis and delivery solutions are expected to show the strongest growth over the five-year forecast period. The sector will grow by eight per cent between 2012-2017 as companies up their invest in this key part of their operations.

“Leveraging the social dimensions of the Internet keeps fueling the collaboration growth, much of which is in the form of software as a service. This is complementary to the increased attention to big data and analytics solutions, which help enterprises to understand and act on anticipated customer behaviorand provide new insights into product reliability and maintenance,” said Henry Morris, senior vice president for Worldwide Software, Services, and Executive Advisory Research.

Enterprise applications such as CRM, ERM, SCM, and operations and manufacturing applications will grow by around six per cent.

“Enterprises are starting to implement applications that either didn’t exist or weren’t needed in the past, such as commerce applications in all industries, not just retail, but also manufacturing, hospitality, food and beverage, and even the public sector,” said Christine Dover, research director, Enterprise Applications and Digital Commerce.

The report also shows IDC is beginning to see applications in categories that didn’t exist in the past, such as subscription billing, spend optimization, and revenue management. Often these are used for requirements that may have previously been met using custom applications or manual processes, explained Ms Dover.

The findings come after a separate study found that BI and analytics software professionals overwhelmingly prefer a cloud-based BI solution over conventional, on-premise installed software for gaining access to the real-time business data they need to make better decisions, according to a new report.

Cloud BI user satisfaction tops 80 per cent, said the report from Dimensional Research.

IBM takes predictive analysis to IT

Posted in Analytics, Business Intelligence, IT by neilwilson1984 on December 3, 2013

IBM is bringing predictive analysis to IT operations to help system administrators better find and solve potential problems.

The firm says its new software will enable clients to apply foundational elements of cognitive intelligence throughout their IT infrastructure. The aim is to help workers gain insights from big data, rather than being focused on how to cope with its sheer volume. Such insights, says IBM, can help predict and prevent IT downtime, improve productivity and generate cost savings.

Increasingly organisations are dealing with complex IT systems of servers, networks and applications. Combined with mobile and cloud, these systems can generate more than 1.3 terabytes of data per day, including log files, software error alerts, IT service tickets and network configuration updates.

This can lead to up to one million system alerts per day, some of which are critical to performance and others that are irrelevant. Sifting through all of these and making sense of it all is where the new software comes in.

IBM SmartCloud Analytics – Predictive Insights enables employees to wade through terabytes of IT operations data in real time, spotting only the trends that are critical to IT network performance. The software’s “cognitive computing capabilities” can learn, reason and sense an organization’s IT systems.

The software adapts as business and performance conditions change, updating settings and eliminating costly errors caused by poor system configuration. This new technology will run on the SoftLayer infrastructure, which is the foundation of IBM’s cloud portfolio.

“As the value of data continues to grow, the differentiator for clients will be around predicting what could happen to help transform their business with speed and conviction,” said Steve Mills, senior vice president and group executive, software and systems at IBM. “IBM’s latest set of solutions allow clients to help predict customer behavior and outcomes with speed and ease, all delivered from the cloud.”

Consolidated Communications is one company working with IBM’s new predictive software. It expects to save $300,000 annually in reactive costs alone by analyzing IT operations data.

BIME secures $4m for business intelligence in cloud

Posted in Business, Business Intelligence, IT by neilwilson1984 on December 2, 2013

French business intelligence company BIME has secured $4 million in new funding.

The Montpellier firm plans to use the money to make continued enhancements to its cloud BI offering that it says turns the entire web into a “seamlessly connected data warehouse” that enables companies to query data sources across the entire web in real-time.

After opening its US headquarters in Kansas City, the firm will also use the money to grow sales in the key North American market.

BIME is part of a fast-growing clutch of next-generation BI providers. Just like Birst or Platfora, these solutions are often easier to install and use, and may even be cheaper than similar products from the established vendors.

“We owe our rapid growth to the success of our unique technology. The rise of Big Data is a reality, and businesses of any size are using cloud-based tools like BIME to become truly data-driven,” said Rachel Delacour, CEO and cofounder. “We help businesses turn the entire web into a seamlessly connected data warehouse. BIME now has the capital and talent to keep innovating and expand globally, particularly in the dynamic US market.”

The $4 million in funding was led by Alven Capital Partners. Jeremy Uzan, investment director with the firm, noted that business analytics is one of the fastest-growing segments of modern IT.

“Every enterprise that is serious about harnessing the value of big data needs to tap into dozens of live data sources and be able to ask questions in the moment. BIME empowers them to do so, with a lightweight yet infinitely scalable service,” he explained.

The current version of BIME v5 consists of an HTML5 framework, an in-memory calculation engine built for speed and a powerful feature set. The firm was the first vendor to offer a BI front-end for Google BigQuery and it has been recognized by Forrester, Design for Experience, and Dresner Advisory Group for its capabilities.